Tag Archives: cardio

Train Hard : Sunday lunch session

8 Sep

Broke ten minutes today with my 2.5km jog on the treadmill with a time of 9.58 – was feeling rather pleased with that. I’ve shaved off over a minute in a week!

Train hard evening session

2 Sep

Cardio

Treadmill run:

11.07  minutes – 2.5km

Building from 12km/h up to 16.5km/h, followed by a 2 minute cool down at 6.5km/h

Peak heart rate – 198bpm

Recovery time – 3 minutes

Recovery heart rate – 198-172 / 10 = 2.6 – needs some work sadly!

 

Weights

Shoulder press resistance machine:

9kg x 10 x 3 sets

Leg press resistance machine:

79kg x 10 x 3 sets

Lat pull down:

32kg x 10 x 2 sets

33.1kg x 5

34.2 x 5

Converging chest press resistance machine:

11kg x 10

18kg x 10 x 2 sets

Train as you mean to go on …

24 Aug

So, I got back into the gym today!

It’s been quite a while since I hit a gym (aside from TRC’s gym, of course – although that’s been a couple of weeks too!)

 

Cardio

Treadmill run:

11.12 minutes – 2.5km

Building from 10km/h up to 16km/h, followed by a 2 minute cool down at 6.5km/h

 

Row:

9.13 minutes – 2012m

2.16.6 avg/500m

18spm avg

Weights

Tricep pressdown with cable:

10.2kg x 10 (reps)

7.9kg x 10

5kg x 10

 

Shoulder press resistance machine:

4.5kg x 10

9kg x 10

14kg x 3

 

Leg press resistance machine:

59kg x 10

66kg x 10

73kg x 10

79kg x 10

 

Bent over row with dumbells:

10kg x 20

 

Bench press with dumbells:

8kg x 20

 

– I have to admit, I left the gym feeling rather smug after seeing a guy’s jaw drop whilst I used the leg press – each time I increased the weight he looked rather surprised!

Despite not having lifted weights for a couple of months, I feel like I can carry on not far from where I left off. Although I’ll be honest, the erging didn’t feel as easy as it has before – however I didn’t have the best shoes on for it, and found myself pushing with my heels instead of my toes – nowhere near as effective.

Next gym session I shall push for 5km as we are now entering winter season, and so we’re back to long, long erg sessions!

Terminology : Rate (Rowing)

31 May

What?

Rate, or Stroke Rate is the number of strokes you take per minute in rowing, also referred to as spm, s/m or rating.

When?

Stroke Rate is used both in the boat, and on an erg during a piece.

Where?

On an erg, the stroke rate is usually displayed in the top right-hand corner of the screen, and is displayed as a number with s/m.

In a boat, the stroke rate is usually measured using a magnet and sensors attached to the underneath of the stroke seat (or under the bow man’s seat in a bowloaded boat), connected to a cox box. As the rower moves up the slide, a measurement is taken and relayed to the cox box.

 

Why?

Stroke rate is used to measure and monitor intensity.

It is important in competitive rowing, as a high stroke rate could mean that the rowers are being hurried and technique is more likely to suffer, subsequently causing the boat to unbalance.

An unbalanced boat means that not all blades are covered properly by the water, and so collectively displace a smaller amount of water, therefore moving the boat forwards less than that of a perfectly balanced boat.

High rating can also cause a crew to tire quickly, however this depends on the level of fitness of the crew. The higher the level of fitness, the higher the stroke rate can be without negatively affecting the balance or technique.

 

And finally …

Try it for yourself …

A low-rate erg session does not have to mean lower intensity!

The best way to maximise your energy output is to row at a lower intensity for longer.

As a good base-level workout for cardio fitness, lower-rate rowing can be used to focus on power.

Try rowing for 20 to 40 minutes at a stroke rate of 18 to 22 – pushing as hard as you can, but taking your time with the recovery – the fitter you get, the you should see your split-time lower, as you are able to use the oxygen more efficiently and push harder with each stroke. Keep a note of your average split time at the end of your piece, and use this to compare your progress over the weeks.

Rowing at a slow rate can burn as much as 400 calories per hour (dependant on your own bodyweight) – so get off the cross trainer and hop on the erg!

Terminology : Heart Recovery Rate

10 May

What?

Recovery Heart Rate is the heart rate measured at a fixed period after you have finished exercising.

When?

In order to measure your Recovery Heart Rate, you would need to work out for at least 8 to 10 minutes – long enough to raise your pulse to near maximal exhaustion.

Typically, you would expect to see your heart rate rise from around 60/70 to 180/190 during exercise.

To be able to compare results over time to assess fitness, you should ideally keep as many of the variables similar as possible – ie. the time of day that you are exercising, along with the period and intensity of exercise.

Where?

You can test your Recovery Heart Rate anywhere!

Using a stopwatch and either your finger to feel your pulse, or an app or heart rate monitor, take your pulse immediately after exercise and note this down.
Wait a minute, then take your pulse again.

The formula for calculating your Recovery Heart Rate is as follows:

RHR = (exercise heart rate – heart rate after 1 minute) / 10

The higher the number for the recovery rate, the more quickly your heart has recovered from exercise.

The following table can be used as a guide to evaluate your recovery rate:

Recovery Rate Number Condition
Less than 2 = Poor
2 to 2.9 = Fair
3 to 3.9 = Good
4 to 5.9 = Excellent
Above 6 = Outstanding

Why?

Measuring your Recovery Heart Rate can be a good indicator of your level of your fitness.

The fitter you get, the more effective your heart becomes, and so the less work it has to do to keep your blood pumping around your body, and keep you moving.

But on the other end of the scale, the less healthy and fit you are, the longer it takes your heart to recover.

This is what is referred to as Cardiovascular Fitness.

Recovery Heart Rate can also indicate the intensity of the exercise you are taking. The smaller the drop in one minute could indicate you are working yourself too hard, and your body is having trouble recuperating.

There are two decreasing phases related to Heart Rate Recovery; the first minute post-exercise, and the resting plateau over which the heart rate gradually decreases.
The resting plateau can take as long as an hour for the heart rate to return to pre-exercise heart rate.

As a general indicator, five minutes after exercise the heart rate should not exceed 120 beats per minute.
After 10 minutes, the heart rate should be below 100 beats per minute, and the heart rate should return to its pre-exercise rate approximately 30 minutes after the exercise session. Although the initial sharp drop in the heart rate that occurs one minute after the exercise is the most meaningful indicator of fitness.

And finally …

Did you know? …

Miguel Indurain – Spanish, five time Tour de France winner – had a resting heart rate of 28 beats per minute – one of the lowest ever recorded in a human.

Train Hard : Gym workout

24 Apr

It’s been a while since I was in the gym, so I made the most of the treadmill – like an excitable dog every time I hop on one!

 

Treadmill Workout

http://www.sports-tracker.com/#/workout/trainhardeatwellbehappy/9an3ts0ccqsu3l8p

I strapped up and gave myself a 30 minute workout on the treadmill 4.85km

  • 1500m jog @ 13km/h                           (07:22 minutes)
  • 300m brisk walk @ 6km/h
  • 200m @ 14.5km/h
  • 200m @ 6km/h
  • 200m @ 15km/h
  • 200m @ 6km/h
  • 200m @ 15.5km/h
  • 300m @ 5km/h
  • 200m @ 16km/h
  • 300m @ 4.5km/h
  • 300m @ 16.5km/h
  • 300m @ 4.5km/h
  • 300m @ 17km/h
  • 350m @ 4km/h

My legs felt alright, and although I reached a PB peak speed on the treadmill, I didn’t feel too much out of breath, or that it was uncomfortable. The only thing stopping me going for longer was the rumbling stomach

 

Weights Workout

I then quickly moved over to the weights whilst still warm (it was a very small gym, so it was literally a hop off and on!) – and all back-to-back as a giant set.

Bench Press (dumbells) :

  • 9kg – 3 sets, 10 reps

Shoulder Press (machine)  :

  • 15kg x 6 reps,
  • 12.5kg x 8 reps,
  • 10kg x 10 reps

Bicep hammer curl (dumbells) :

  • 7kg x 10 reps,
  • 6kg x 10 reps,
  • 5kg x 10 reps

Leg press (upright machine) :

  • 80kg x 10 reps,
  • 90kg x 10 reps,
  • 100kg x 10 reps,
  • 110kg x 10 reps,
  • 120kg x 10 reps

 

A fairly short workout – about an hour in total, but my arms felt exhausted after that! It’s been a while since I have done much in the way of weights for my arms, as weights sessions at training haven’t been arm specific, but upper body in general.

Awaiting the DOMS! 🙂

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