Tag Archives: fitness

Terminology : Rate (Rowing)

31 May

What?

Rate, or Stroke Rate is the number of strokes you take per minute in rowing, also referred to as spm, s/m or rating.

When?

Stroke Rate is used both in the boat, and on an erg during a piece.

Where?

On an erg, the stroke rate is usually displayed in the top right-hand corner of the screen, and is displayed as a number with s/m.

In a boat, the stroke rate is usually measured using a magnet and sensors attached to the underneath of the stroke seat (or under the bow man’s seat in a bowloaded boat), connected to a cox box. As the rower moves up the slide, a measurement is taken and relayed to the cox box.

 

Why?

Stroke rate is used to measure and monitor intensity.

It is important in competitive rowing, as a high stroke rate could mean that the rowers are being hurried and technique is more likely to suffer, subsequently causing the boat to unbalance.

An unbalanced boat means that not all blades are covered properly by the water, and so collectively displace a smaller amount of water, therefore moving the boat forwards less than that of a perfectly balanced boat.

High rating can also cause a crew to tire quickly, however this depends on the level of fitness of the crew. The higher the level of fitness, the higher the stroke rate can be without negatively affecting the balance or technique.

 

And finally …

Try it for yourself …

A low-rate erg session does not have to mean lower intensity!

The best way to maximise your energy output is to row at a lower intensity for longer.

As a good base-level workout for cardio fitness, lower-rate rowing can be used to focus on power.

Try rowing for 20 to 40 minutes at a stroke rate of 18 to 22 – pushing as hard as you can, but taking your time with the recovery – the fitter you get, the you should see your split-time lower, as you are able to use the oxygen more efficiently and push harder with each stroke. Keep a note of your average split time at the end of your piece, and use this to compare your progress over the weeks.

Rowing at a slow rate can burn as much as 400 calories per hour (dependant on your own bodyweight) – so get off the cross trainer and hop on the erg!

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Be Happy : Blog Refresh!

15 May

Everyone deserves a little spring clean – and that doesn’t just apply to the car, or your home …

I’ve given my blog a little refresh ready for summer!

So welcome to the newly refreshed …

 

Train Hard, Eat Well, Be Happy

 

In the weeks to come, I’d like this site to become a tool for anyone interested in health, fitness and food!

A place to share tips, information, recipes and inspiration and motivation to others, along with my blog updates on my own training.

So to the gym-goers, fitness freaks and foodies – whether you are training for a marathon, want to lose a few pounds or just enjoy a good run around the park, this is for you!

Regular updates to be developed over the coming weeks will include:

Monday’s Motivator; for when you need that little bit of inspiration after a busy weekend!

Wednesday’s Workout; short and sweet workouts for you to have a go at – from exercises you can do at your desk, to stretches in the kitchen – and the best bit being, you won’t need to go out of your way to include a Wednesday Workout in your week!

Friday’s Factswhether it’s fitness related, or general health and diet – tips and reminders to keep you on the straight and narrow just before the weekend!

Sunday’s Serving; I love to bake and cook but Sunday afternoon is my only free time to do this, and so I plan to test out new gluten-free recipes on Sundays, and share them with you here.

 

I’m forever updating the site, and looking for ways to improve and keep it interesting and useful – therefore if anyone has any comments or questions they’d like to share, I’d LOVE to hear from you.

 

Meanwhile, Happy Wednesday!

Charlotte

– a fitness-freak with a passion for food and life!

Terminology : Heart Recovery Rate

10 May

What?

Recovery Heart Rate is the heart rate measured at a fixed period after you have finished exercising.

When?

In order to measure your Recovery Heart Rate, you would need to work out for at least 8 to 10 minutes – long enough to raise your pulse to near maximal exhaustion.

Typically, you would expect to see your heart rate rise from around 60/70 to 180/190 during exercise.

To be able to compare results over time to assess fitness, you should ideally keep as many of the variables similar as possible – ie. the time of day that you are exercising, along with the period and intensity of exercise.

Where?

You can test your Recovery Heart Rate anywhere!

Using a stopwatch and either your finger to feel your pulse, or an app or heart rate monitor, take your pulse immediately after exercise and note this down.
Wait a minute, then take your pulse again.

The formula for calculating your Recovery Heart Rate is as follows:

RHR = (exercise heart rate – heart rate after 1 minute) / 10

The higher the number for the recovery rate, the more quickly your heart has recovered from exercise.

The following table can be used as a guide to evaluate your recovery rate:

Recovery Rate Number Condition
Less than 2 = Poor
2 to 2.9 = Fair
3 to 3.9 = Good
4 to 5.9 = Excellent
Above 6 = Outstanding

Why?

Measuring your Recovery Heart Rate can be a good indicator of your level of your fitness.

The fitter you get, the more effective your heart becomes, and so the less work it has to do to keep your blood pumping around your body, and keep you moving.

But on the other end of the scale, the less healthy and fit you are, the longer it takes your heart to recover.

This is what is referred to as Cardiovascular Fitness.

Recovery Heart Rate can also indicate the intensity of the exercise you are taking. The smaller the drop in one minute could indicate you are working yourself too hard, and your body is having trouble recuperating.

There are two decreasing phases related to Heart Rate Recovery; the first minute post-exercise, and the resting plateau over which the heart rate gradually decreases.
The resting plateau can take as long as an hour for the heart rate to return to pre-exercise heart rate.

As a general indicator, five minutes after exercise the heart rate should not exceed 120 beats per minute.
After 10 minutes, the heart rate should be below 100 beats per minute, and the heart rate should return to its pre-exercise rate approximately 30 minutes after the exercise session. Although the initial sharp drop in the heart rate that occurs one minute after the exercise is the most meaningful indicator of fitness.

And finally …

Did you know? …

Miguel Indurain – Spanish, five time Tour de France winner – had a resting heart rate of 28 beats per minute – one of the lowest ever recorded in a human.

Train Hard : Bank Holiday Morning Run

6 May

Just because we got ourselves cups at the weekend, it doesn’t mean training ends there – that’s just the start! Henley is getting closer on the horizon!

This means the focus is now on maintaining and pushing the fitness, and developing the racing start technique.

Today, I’m working on the fitness!

As usual, I’ve been out strapped up with my phone and Bluetooth Heart Rate Monitor, and logged the route on my SportsTracker profile.

Despite the racing Saturday (+ the 16km row to and from the Regatta!) – part way along my legs definitely felt shot! – I was rather pleased with my performance.

My first 2.5km was in 9 minutes 39 seconds, and I managed to keep an average between 13 and 14km/h – this was what I had been working up to on the treadmill, but never tried it out on the road!

I have to admit though – I did have a couple of quick pit-stops en-route. I got from my house up to the big Sainsburys in Wandsworth (about 2.75km) and felt my legs were dying – I wondered what was wrong with me! It was at this point that I realised the pace I had been running at, and soon worked out why I was starting to hurt!

As you can see from the heart rate – the brief blips are where I stopped to catch my breath and stretch out my legs before running on.

Heart Rate Recovery

In terms of recovery, I finished running at 28 minutes, then quick walked home at an average pace of 6-6.5km for the last 4 minutes before stopping altogether, and my heart rate dropped as follows.

109bpm @ 0 minutes (start of exercise)

193bpm @ 28 minutes (end of run – 13-14km/h average)

145bpm @ 29 minutes (jogging at 6km/h)

132bpm @ 30 minutes (jogging at 6km/h)

115bpm @ 32 minutes (end of exercise)

Using the heart rate recovery calculation (see Terminology), this would put me at (193-145) / 10 = 4.8 – I’m rather pleased with that for now, especially as this is not a true reflection of recovery rate given that I was still moving!

Let the sun shine!

It just goes to show what a bit of sunshine, and some good tunes can do to push you, no matter how tired you feel before you head out!

I’m looking forward to plenty more runs out in the summer sun over the next few months. Although most of my friends would think I’m mental, going for a run early on a Sunday/Bank Holiday Monday can be great for the soul. Barely anyone around, the roads are quiet and the air is fresh and cool, it is a real pleasure to live in South West London!

Be Happy : Instagram – 6th May 2013

6 May

insta_2013_05_06_a

Train Hard : Sprint Season Training : on the RowPerfect

27 Mar

Sprint Season Training : on the RowPerfect

I’ve been resting for almost 2 full weeks now, trying to shift this cough, and so far so good.
It’s much better than it was 4 weeks ago, although still not clear, I now think it’s just a case of the asthma rather than an infection. So I need to remember to keep taking the brown inhaler.

Anyway – tonight’s session was my first for the Sprint Season training …

Sprint Training

Discipline : RowPerfect

Rate : Mixed

  • 2 mins @ Rate 18 : 5km split + 20 seconds
  • 90 seconds @ Rate 28 : 5km split
  • 90 seconds @ free rate : 5km split – 10 seconds

Time : 40 mins

And my results:

Distance : 9134m

Energy : 344kj

Strokes : 110

Average split : 2 min

Average power : 143.2w

Average Stoke Rate : 27.5

Drive/Recovery Ratio : 1.86

Maximal Power : 246w

Maximal Split : 1.47.2

Maximal Stoke Rate : 37.6

Drive/Recovery Ratio : 11.04

So despite the coughing, I didn’t feel too bad.

The last 3 minutes hurt, and Jacqui and Anna were shouting at us from behind to make us push harder and harder.

In the last 30 seconds I could feel the lactic acid rising from my stomach up to my throat and I was really worried I’d be sick – like one of the lads from the squad was! – however I managed to keep it down, and finish gracefully!

I’ll be using those figures to work from next week! 🙂

Train Hard : Back on the bike – it’s been a while!

25 Jan

https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msa=0&msid=206030816959479985649.0004d41d50167cbc5aa2a 25/01/2013 8:37am Cycle To Work Total distance: 12.52 km (7.8 mi) Total time: 46:54 Moving time: 43:55 Average speed: 16.01 km/h (9.9 mi/h) Average moving speed: 17.10 km/h (10.6 mi/h) Max speed: 29.92 km/h (18.6 mi/h) Average pace: 3.75 min/km (6.0 min/mi) Average moving pace: 3.51 min/km (5.6 min/mi) Fastest pace: 2.01 min/km (3.2 min/mile) Max elevation: 92 m (301 ft) Min elevation: 48 m (156 ft) Elevation gain: 158 m (519 ft) Max grade: 10 % Min grade: -6 % Recorded: 25/01/2013 8:37am It’s been a while since the white wheels left Waldron Road! It was a really nice ride in though – little bit nippy, but nothing a thermal baselayer and gloves couldn’t fix! In fact I’d worked up quite a sweat by the time I got into the office – it was a well needed shower – shame the office shower has no power, just a trickle! Not too annoyed about getting lost though – the detour took me round Notting Hill, where my office used to be, so it was nice to be back roubd there. I remember why it’s called Notting Hill too!

Train Hard : Post-Xmas RowPerfect Benchmarking

5 Jan

So, having had a nice break away from the club over Christmas … well, a few days at least, today was the first fitness testing for 2013.

Discipline : RowPerfect

Rate : Capped at 28

Distance : 5km

Time : 20 min : 03 sec

Average split time : 2 min

Strokes : 565

Be Happy : TRC

30 Aug

I was a little early – perhaps a bit of an eager beaver! I overestimated how long it would take to get to the club from work, and so got to the club twenty minutes earlier than expected!

I sat and chatted to Ralph until the others turned up, and we discussed the impact of the Olympics on the squad.

Thames Rowing Club generally take on about 60 novices a year, and as the season goes on and weather gets worse numbers drop.

August 2012, TRC had interest from over 150 people, and Ralph was amazed by the popularity. The Gold rush of medals at the Sydney 2000 Olympics had increased numbers, however the impact of the London Olympics had become rather apparent.

 

5 others turned up, 2 girls and 3 guys, and we were taken on a tour of the facilities – the boathouse, and the club – before being taken up to the gym for a quick intro to the correct rowing technique on a rowing machine – also known as an ‘erg’ or an ‘ergo’, and a quick session in the indoor tank.

The facilities are great, and Ralph was really lovely.

He took our details and said he will be in touch within the next couple of weeks with information on the start of the season, and the training schedule.

Fingers crossed! 🙂

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