Tag Archives: Rowing

Train hard evening session

2 Sep

Cardio

Treadmill run:

11.07  minutes – 2.5km

Building from 12km/h up to 16.5km/h, followed by a 2 minute cool down at 6.5km/h

Peak heart rate – 198bpm

Recovery time – 3 minutes

Recovery heart rate – 198-172 / 10 = 2.6 – needs some work sadly!

 

Weights

Shoulder press resistance machine:

9kg x 10 x 3 sets

Leg press resistance machine:

79kg x 10 x 3 sets

Lat pull down:

32kg x 10 x 2 sets

33.1kg x 5

34.2 x 5

Converging chest press resistance machine:

11kg x 10

18kg x 10 x 2 sets

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Train as you mean to go on …

24 Aug

So, I got back into the gym today!

It’s been quite a while since I hit a gym (aside from TRC’s gym, of course – although that’s been a couple of weeks too!)

 

Cardio

Treadmill run:

11.12 minutes – 2.5km

Building from 10km/h up to 16km/h, followed by a 2 minute cool down at 6.5km/h

 

Row:

9.13 minutes – 2012m

2.16.6 avg/500m

18spm avg

Weights

Tricep pressdown with cable:

10.2kg x 10 (reps)

7.9kg x 10

5kg x 10

 

Shoulder press resistance machine:

4.5kg x 10

9kg x 10

14kg x 3

 

Leg press resistance machine:

59kg x 10

66kg x 10

73kg x 10

79kg x 10

 

Bent over row with dumbells:

10kg x 20

 

Bench press with dumbells:

8kg x 20

 

– I have to admit, I left the gym feeling rather smug after seeing a guy’s jaw drop whilst I used the leg press – each time I increased the weight he looked rather surprised!

Despite not having lifted weights for a couple of months, I feel like I can carry on not far from where I left off. Although I’ll be honest, the erging didn’t feel as easy as it has before – however I didn’t have the best shoes on for it, and found myself pushing with my heels instead of my toes – nowhere near as effective.

Next gym session I shall push for 5km as we are now entering winter season, and so we’re back to long, long erg sessions!

Train Hard, Rest Easy and Party like the Season’s Over!

26 Jul

I apologise for having been AWOL for a couple of weeks since the big race – but I haven’t gone, I’m still here – I’ve not retired early! I raced last weekend at Molesey Regatta, and am very much looking forward to the last couple of regattas before the season finishes for the summer.

You may have spotted I’ve been busy with the uploads to my instagram, and since Women’s Henley I’ve had a couple of weeks off to relax and catch-up with friends that I haven’t seen since October 2012, and make the most of the amazing weather we have recently been spoilt with!

Tonight is the End of Season party at the club – despite there still being a further two regattas in the novice race calendar! – but this weekend I have some spare time, and will update this page with the latest goings-on from South West London.

Train Hard : The real countdown begins!

14 Jun

Just a week to go until Henley Women’s Regatta qualifiers!

Train Hard : Road to Henley!

5 Jun

It’s been a couple of weeks since I’ve been on an erg, as the last few weeks have been used for race prep, with lots of mid-week outings, however on the road to Henley, the training is getting ramped up further!

Tonight’s work was 2 x 5km pieces, rate 18.

It hurt!

Weight : 58.6kg

Piece 1

Time : 22.00.1
Average Split : 2.12.0
Average Stroke Rate : 19
Watts : 152
Calories : 302

Piece 2

Time : 22.37.2
Average Split : 2.15.7
Average Stroke Rate : 18
Watts : 140
Calories : 294
 

A good 37 seconds slower in the second piece, after a five minute break – understandably so though!

Race Hard : Met Regatta – Saturday June 1st 2013

1 Jun

Despite the racing being out at Eton Dorney – 20 miles from home – we were quite fortunate that our heat wasn’t until 11am, and as I was driving that meant an alarm call of 7 as usual!

The drive to Dorney was pretty quick, however as we got towards the lake the sat nav decided it knew better and tried to take us off down someone’s driveway! As a result, we ended up slightly lost in Eton, in amongst some rather magnificent buildings!

Once we found out exactly where we were meant to head to – the Mets’ website did warn that sat navs don’t like the area! – it only took a couple of minutes to get there, and we soon got parked up.
What we didn’t realise was that we were parked halfway along one side of the lake, and the boats were on the opposite side – what looked so close actually took ages to walk!

 

All rigged up!

Boat rigging took barely any time, and we soon had the Noel ready to race.
We had a crew chat with our cox Marie – she ran us through the race plan so that we knew what to expect, and soon after it was hands on.

Once again, forgetting how far the boat was from the start of the lake we set off carrying the Noel down to the pontoons. About a hundred metres down, the real weight of the boat hit us! We only ever carry it from the boathouse down the embankment – 100m at most!

Whilst it feels a little more glamorous standing on a pontoon to put the boat into the water, there’s something a little unnerving about the fact its floating, and one wrong move and you – or worse, the whole crew! – could slip and go in with the boat!

Anyway, we got the boat in the water, pushed off and headed down the warm up lake – hidden behind the bank – to make our way to the start.

 

Race Warm Up

We worked through the usual warm-up of hands, hands and bodies, and working our way up the slide. We then had a couple of racing starts in an attempt to burn off a little adrenalin.

The marshall called the boats from our heat to get into order, and directed us down and through the bridge to get into position.
We were lane 6, therefore second from last to pull through onto the lake, and got ourselves into position as quickly as we could.

 

Attention!

Unlike the regattas we had entered prior to this, the start was much more formal – we were given a countdown to the race start from the official in the box, and once all boats were docked at the start the official called attention, then a short pause before the digital boards on shore lit up green and beeped to signal the start.

 

Our start

Unfortunately, the official called the start whilst Marie still had her hand raised, as we were still tapping the boat straight, and so we were all a little caught out.

Our start wasn’t awful, but we weren’t getting much power down, and there wasn’t the rhythm in the boat, which made the race a battle.

In terms of pacing, we were told to go all-out in the first 250-500 to get a good start, then lengthen and pace it out, before pushing again for the 1500m mark, and again for the last 250m.

Without the rhythm it was hard getting the power down, not only this but there were too many blades not catching properly and so Marie had the boat on full steer to bow-side for the whole race as bow-side were pulling the boat over to the lane to our left. Consequently steering adjustments have an effect on both balance and speed, and in an ideal world over the length of a straight-lane there should be very little steering required.

Despite feeling like forever to get to the mid-way mark, the race was much quicker than I had feared, and we finished the race 6th out of 7.

Obviously gutted as a crew not to have got through to the next round, or repechage, however it was a great experience – racing on a lake against 6 other boats was very exciting and new to us all.

 

Easy Oar!

Once we got the boat back on trestles, we were then left to chill out for the rest of the day, whilst the rest of the crews had their races, and so we sat by the finish line to have lunch and cheer on TRC crews.

My parents had made the journey to Eton Dorney to watch us race – I spotted my mum, busy with her camera taking photos of us all as we were getting in to the water! – and so they joined us to sit and watch.

It was nice to be able to spend some time with them whilst watching the racing. Training has taken over everything recently, and has meant that I am unable to go home to see the family like I used to, and so the only opportunity I get is if they happen to come into London – so it was nice to see my dad again for the first time in 6 months!

 

And so the end of Day 1 at Eton Dorney drew to a close …

And I get to do it all again tomorrow, with the other 8 that I’m racing in this weekend!

Terminology : Rate (Rowing)

31 May

What?

Rate, or Stroke Rate is the number of strokes you take per minute in rowing, also referred to as spm, s/m or rating.

When?

Stroke Rate is used both in the boat, and on an erg during a piece.

Where?

On an erg, the stroke rate is usually displayed in the top right-hand corner of the screen, and is displayed as a number with s/m.

In a boat, the stroke rate is usually measured using a magnet and sensors attached to the underneath of the stroke seat (or under the bow man’s seat in a bowloaded boat), connected to a cox box. As the rower moves up the slide, a measurement is taken and relayed to the cox box.

 

Why?

Stroke rate is used to measure and monitor intensity.

It is important in competitive rowing, as a high stroke rate could mean that the rowers are being hurried and technique is more likely to suffer, subsequently causing the boat to unbalance.

An unbalanced boat means that not all blades are covered properly by the water, and so collectively displace a smaller amount of water, therefore moving the boat forwards less than that of a perfectly balanced boat.

High rating can also cause a crew to tire quickly, however this depends on the level of fitness of the crew. The higher the level of fitness, the higher the stroke rate can be without negatively affecting the balance or technique.

 

And finally …

Try it for yourself …

A low-rate erg session does not have to mean lower intensity!

The best way to maximise your energy output is to row at a lower intensity for longer.

As a good base-level workout for cardio fitness, lower-rate rowing can be used to focus on power.

Try rowing for 20 to 40 minutes at a stroke rate of 18 to 22 – pushing as hard as you can, but taking your time with the recovery – the fitter you get, the you should see your split-time lower, as you are able to use the oxygen more efficiently and push harder with each stroke. Keep a note of your average split time at the end of your piece, and use this to compare your progress over the weeks.

Rowing at a slow rate can burn as much as 400 calories per hour (dependant on your own bodyweight) – so get off the cross trainer and hop on the erg!

Train Hard : MET Regatta Race Prep

30 May

Race Prep

So last night was the last outing pre-MET regatta.

It’s been a very busy week since Twickenham Regatta, with training on Monday (despite it being a Bank Holiday, and day of rest for everyone non-rower!), and outings both Tuesday night, and last night.

The outing on Tuesday was with the crew for Saturday’s racing, and last night’s was for Sunday’s crew – both 8’s. Both outings were to be used for ‘polishing’. The coaches have told us the crews don’t need much help, but just small adjustments now to correct little issues, to gain an extra inch or so each stroke. Every inch counts!

 

A pain in the neck!

My neck is still feeling the strain from last week, and all of the race training hasn’t helped it much – it’s gone from a central, nerve-tingling pain, to the right-hand-side – therefore more to do with the long-term issue, most likely exacerbated by rowing on bow-side, and so putting more tension on my right-hand-side. Something to look into in terms of physio help.

The outings were focussed on racing starts, working on getting catches in together, making sure not to rip the water on the first few strokes, and to keep the finishes long. By the end of each outing, the crews felt much more jelled together.

Last night was particularly tiring, as we rowed up to St Paul’s, and then did 3 x 3-minute pieces with racing starts, rating about 34/36.

Once we get into the rhythm of things, the stroke is lengthened out, the rate levelled and breathing becomes less erratic and more natural, the boat seems much easier to push along. It’s all down to getting into rhythm, and keeping the timing – as soon as one blade comes out a little too early, that throws things and the pacing is then off for a few strokes. It’s whether we can keep composure and get the rhythm back that matters.

 

Derigging

The outing didn’t feel that long – although we did have a long crew discussion before outing in the crew room – but my back was definitely feeling it by the end of the session!

Once we got the boat off the water, it was time to derig ready for loading for the weekend – that should save some time on Friday! 🙂

 

Taking a breather

I’ll be taking the next two evenings off training – having spent all weekend at the club, it would be good to get some good space from it before the weekend, to recompose and take a breather ready for racing!

 

Train Hard : 2km Testing – Round 2

13 May

It’s been a couple of weeks since the last test, and we’ve had races and camp in between, but here it is – my results from tonight’s 2km.

Time : 8.00.1
Average Split : 2.00.0
Average Stroke Rate : 28
Weight Pre-testing : 56.1kg

Split breakdown :
0-500m : 1.55.4
500-1000m : 2.00.4
1000-1500m : 2.03.0
1500-2000m : 2.01.3

 

Building on the last 2km, I had a plan and I tried to stick to it, but I found myself stupidly pushing at the wrong times.

I went off hard and quick in the first 100m, to get myself a good head start and got my split down to 1.50.0, however as I then eased out to get a consistent pace I aimed for my previous split of 1.58.0 and failed to stick at it and couldn’t keep my rate high enough. I just didn’t have the energy in my legs or glutes to push harder, and my arms wouldn’t move any quicker.

I’ve lost a kilo since the last test, I hadn’t eaten much today and last week I had come down with the start of a virus – I’m hoping this may be the reason I just couldn’t find the energy to push for more.

As I finished the test my cough kicked off again, and I could feel a lot of gunk loosened off in my chest.

I’m a little annoyed with myself – I’m not going to lie! I’m far to competitive not to be! But having said that, it’s not an awful time in the grand scheme of things, it would have just been nice to get it a little lower – it’s only a difference of 4.4 seconds on my last test, and I have missed the last few erg sessions as I keep running myself in to the ground! I’m still trying to master the art of balancing all angles of life!

Annoyingly though, heart-rate-wise I recovered quickly, and more importantly it didn’t just give up mid-erg!

Sports Tracker Workout Results for 2km testing

Race Hard : Chiswick Regatta 2013 – Final!

4 May

Heat : TRC vs. Putney Town vs. Sons of the Thames

I forgot to mention in my brief post – post-heat – that after our long and strenuous row up to the start line – (yep, nothing better than an 8km row to warm up prior to an 800m race!) as we turned and got into position to race against Putney Town and Sons of the Thames, the heavens decided to open up! Huge black clouds surrounded us, and just as the marshalls called ‘Ready’, we were flooded! It didn’t stop us though, and we got our game-faces on, and got on with the job in hand!

I took my phone out in the boat with me – in a neat little waterproof case of course, as we have a habit of getting soaked in races, with far too much backsplash going on! – and recorded the heat using GPS and SportsTracker.

As the marshall shouted ‘Attention’, we buried our blades and got into it. With my eyes still in the boat, I could see the nearest boat – Son of the Thames – appearing to move off quicker than us, and getting a good half a boat-length ahead of us. However I could also see the third boat disappearing into the distance as we lengthened out our strokes and got the power down in the boat.

Given the slow start, we soon picked up the pace and caught up with Sons of the Thames, to overtake them, and win the heat by half a boat length. We were all unsure on whether or not we made it in time till we got back onto land – but from what I could see in the corner of my eye, I was pretty sure we’d got to the line just before them!

We were also rather surprised at the result of the heat before ours – Lea had been knocked out, along with Putney Town’s other team to race against Tyrian in the final.

The Final : TRC vs Tyrian

So after the four hour wait, we gathered up all of our belongings and got back into our race gear …

 

post_2013_05_04

 

… which had been drying out on the riggers post-heat!

We’d had a good crew chat, in prep for the race, and we were all very excited about it!

The weather had changed – the clouds had moved on and the sun was now out – the water was still and low, and gone were the wind and waves.

Once again we lined up against the competition – Tyrian – and waited for the marshall to call it.

As with the heat, we appeared to lose ground on the start. Although we were much more in time, and the start felt good, Tyrian still shot off quicker than we did. According to Ted, we were a length behind at one point, however as we dug in and lengthened out the strokes we came through and pulled past Tyrian.

We finished the race a boat length ahead – in fact the race was won almost a hundred metres from the final, with Tyrian slumped over their blades and looking like they’d been beaten before it was even over!

Although our starts may not be the best – and bearing in mind this was still only the second time we’d rowed together as a crew, having had subs on outings before – our power and strength in the water was definitely our strength, and the psychological ‘warfare’ we had over the other crew made a huge difference.

Tankards for Ten!

During our crew chat, pre-final, we had all discussed how much we wanted those pewter tankards, and our cox Clare decided she would use that to motivate us and keep us going strong!

‘Tankards for Ten’ was what she called out, instead of the usual ‘Legs for ten’, and it certainly did the trick!

And so here we are …

 

post_2013_05_04_tankards

 

Left to right : myself, Belinda, Holly, Kathrin, Laura, Clare (cox), Skye, Hannah and Marketa.

 

Looking very pleased with ourselves, with our tankards at Quintin Boat Club!

As with the heat, I used my phone to track the race – the details of which can be found here on SportsTracker.

So, we’re now no longer Novices at TRC – having popped our rowing cherries! – we now move on to racing in the IM3 category – very exciting, given the short rowing experience we have had so far!

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